Sunday, May 10, 2020

The Media Lynching of Gregory and Travis McMichael

"THE TRUTH ABOUT AHMAUD ARBERY"--Stefan Molyneux (48 min.)

I'm sure by now all of you have heard or read some news account of the shooting of Ahmaud Arbery back in February and the arrest of Gregory McMichael and his son, Travis, for Arbery's "murder." At first blush, this appears to be a cautionary tale of what could happen if you try and pursue and run down a criminal. But, similar to George Zimmerman's shooting of Trayvon Martin and Darren Wilson's shooting of Michael Brown, what was a seemingly clear case of self-defense to those that investigated the matters has been caught up in the media outrage machine and two-men that had initially been cleared of wrong-doing are now facing murder charges and a trial.

      I recommend that you watch Stefan Molyneux's video above about the facts of the case, most of which is being ignored in the media. But the short story is that Arbery has a criminal history that includes theft and gun charges--so, he isn't the good kid that "dindu nuffin." More to the point, on the fateful day in February, Arbery dressed in cargo shorts and what might be boots and, if the media is to believed, decided to go "jogging" in a neighborhood some 11 miles from where he lived. A true marathon runner. While in the neighborhood, he was seen to enter a house that was under construction. Since the neighborhood had been subject to a rash of break-ins, someone that saw Arbery commit his breaking and entering called police.

      In the interim, Gregory McMichael--a former LEO--became aware of the situation and he and his son decided to follow Arbery, probably in order to let police know Arbery's location. At some point, McMichael had told Arbery that he (McMichael) wanted to talk to him. Arbery turned to run off another direction, but then, as I understood it, turned again and approached the vehicle used by the McMichaels. Travis McMichael was standing near the front corner of the vehicle when Arbery rushed him, striking McMichael and then grabbed the barrel of the shotgun, pulling it toward himself, as shown by later ballistic evidence. The shotgun went off, wounding Arbery. Whether through his own actions or that of McMichael, there were two more shots fired.

     The reason that the McMichaels hadn't been charged is that the matter had been investigated by police, an outside prosecutor brought in to review the evidence, and a determination made that the McMichaels had done nothing wrong in following or trying to engage with Arbery, and that the shooting of Arbery was either a result of his own actions or self-defense.

     But now the McMichaels have been tried and judged by the media and black celebrities, and found guilty of murder. The fear of political repercussions and/or potential violence has resulted in the McMichaels being charged with murder and, even if they prevail at what will probably be little more than show-trial, bankrupting them and shadowing them with controversy for the remainder of their lives.

     In my mind, the reason for cases like this have less to do with justice than to serve the purpose of the lynchings of old: to teach a lesson. And in this case, and the others referenced above, the lesson appears to be that whites (or, in the case of Zimmerman, Hispanics) are not allowed to defend themselves against black criminals.

2 comments:

  1. They say never judge a person by their looks, but I must be honest and admit that the first time I saw the mugshots of the two suspects on the screen...I indeed thought "trailer trash rednecks" Sad to say, but regardless of any influence the media might have...these mens physical appearances alone will not help them one bit in their upcoming legal battle. They could potentially be innocent, but they certainly "look the part."

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    1. And it is that stereotype which the media wants to perpetuate.

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