Monday, August 19, 2019

You Can't Stop the Signal: "30% of Confiscated Firearms in California are Homemade"

Or so reports an article from Ammo Land. Quoting an NBC news report, the article relates:
An Investigation by NBC Bay Area in partnership with NBC San Diego, NBC Los Angeles, and the non-profit journalists at The Trace found that law enforcement agencies across California are recovering record numbers of ghost guns. According to several ATF sources, 30 percent of all guns now recovered by agents in communities throughout California are homemade, un-serialized firearms, known on the street as “ghost guns.”
While the author of the Ammo Land article is skeptical of such a high number, he mentions a Small Arms Survey report (PDF) that states:
Improvised and craft-produced small arms account for a sizable proportion of weapons seized in domestic law enforcement operations in several countries. In the UK, some 80 per cent of all guns used in crime in 2011 and 2012 were improvised, craft-produced, or converted; in São Paulo, Brazil, 48 per cent of the sub-machine guns recovered during the same period were homemade; and in Indonesia, 98 percent of the guns confiscated from robbery suspects in 2013 were homemade.
Related article: "California’s Background Check Law Had No Impact on Gun Deaths, Johns Hopkins Study Finds"--FEE (h/t Instapundit).
      In 1991, California simultaneously imposed comprehensive background checks for firearm sales and prohibited gun sales (and gun possession) to people convicted of misdemeanor violent crimes. The legislation mandated that all gun sales, including private transactions, would have to go through a California-licensed Federal Firearms License (FFL) dealer. Shotguns and rifles, like handguns, became subject to a 15-day waiting period to make certain all gun purchasers had undergone a thorough background check.

      It was the most expansive state gun control legislation in America, affecting an estimated one million gun buyers in the first year alone. Though costly and cumbersome, politicians and law enforcement agreed the law was worth it.

      The legislation would “keep more guns out of the hands of the people who shouldn’t have them,” said then-Republican Gov. George Deukmejian.

     “I think the new laws are going to help counter the violence,” said LAPD spokesman William D. Booth.

      More than a quarter of a century later, researchers at Johns Hopkins and UC Davis dug  into the results of the sweeping legislation. Researchers compared yearly gun suicide and homicide rates over the 10 years following implementation of California’s law with 32 control states that did not have such laws.

       They found “no change in the rates of either cause of death from firearms through 2000.”

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