Tuesday, November 24, 2015

A Quick Run Around the Web--November 24, 2015


Bruno Liljefors, Studie till Ung tjäderskytt (1923-24)

In the McDonald case, ministers, community leaders and others worry the graphic images of the shooting from the squad car dash-board camera could lead to the kind of unrest seen in Baltimore and Ferguson, Missouri, following police-involved deaths, including that of Michael Brown.  
    'I'm definitely concerned about people's outrage,' said the Rev. Corey Brooks of the New Beginnings Church on Chicago's south side.
      'Many in my community feel betrayed, they are so very angry and protests are imminent. It's clear from the meeting today that Emanuel knows that,' said the Rev. Ira Acree of the Greater St. John Bible Church on the west side. 
      • Related: "Take that! Obama: Climate summit a ‘powerful rebuke’ to terrorists"--Climate Depot.  "'I think it is absolutely vital for every country, every leader, to send a signal that the viciousness of a handful of killers does not stop the world from doing vital business, and that Paris … is not going to be cowered by the violent, demented actions of a few,' Obama said about the upcoming climate conference."
      Fearing that China will see an exodus of manufacturers, Chinese Communist Party Chief Xi Jinping last year called for “an industrial robot revolution” in China, which has become the world’s largest market for automation. 
      Looking ahead to 2050, the future appears mixed for consumers around the globe. Low-cost production in China has helped suppress inflation in the U.S., Europe and at home. It is an open question whether automation can hold down costs as effectively as Chinese peasant labor did. But consumers should look forward to more choice, faster delivery and, perhaps, less harm to the environment.

      Some technologists even think that inventions such as 3-D printing—essentially printers that replicate solid objects like copiers reproduce printed pages—will have a big impact by 2050. In such a world, printers could spew out clothing, food, electronics and other goods ordered online from a nearly limitless selection, with far fewer workers involved in production.
                    The New Shepard rocket lifted off from Blue Origin's launch facility in Van Horn, Texas, on Nov. 23, 2015, flew about 2,800 mph, and soared to more than 62 miles above the Earth, the company said in a press release.
                      After deploying a space capsule, the rocket then plummeted back toward the ground, reignited its booster, and — in a world first — gently and safely touched down in the middle of a landing target.

                      (Source)

                      No comments:

                      Post a Comment