Saturday, February 4, 2017

Women and Domestic Violence Against Men

       I've noted in passing (see here and here) that domestic violence initiated by women is under appreciated in our society. For instance, in the United States, women initiate the majority of incidents of domestic violence, although men are more likely to seriously injure or kill a women. (See also here for additional links to the CDC study; and here for studies revealing that the high incidents of domestic violence among lesbian couples). It is also clear that women are the aggressors/attackers in nearly half of sexual assaults. (See also this article at Time magazine and this article at The Pacific Standard; and this article on female-on-female rape in the Congo). And, as I noted just the other day, women are more than capable of committing murder: 1 in 6 known serial killers were female.

       Dalrock has recently posted an article entitled "The Duluth model is working as designed; you won’t smart mouth her again." His article was inspired by the outing of a Facebook group of women that would post about abusing boyfriends and husbands. The Duluth model, in case you don't know, is a domestic abuse intervention program widely used throughout the United States. It is based on the feminist theory that "domestic violence is the result of patriarchal ideology in which men are encouraged and expected to control their partners". As would be expected from such a source, the Duluth model assumes that men are the aggressors--something, that Dalrock explains, is used to great effect by vindictive women to harass and punish men. So pervasive is the bias that, as Dalrock reports, if a man is a victim of domestic abuse, the only viable option available to him under the law is to "Run and don’t go to the police."

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