Friday, October 26, 2018

October 26, 2018 -- A Quick Run Around The Web

"A basic bug out bag"--Survival Prepping for Normal People (14 min.)
The author discusses and demonstrates what items to put into a basic bug-out-bag (BOB).

        At the property line I asked about the NO TRESPASSING signs and the prepper obsession with security. He said the signs were to ward off a poaching neighbor; he has no problem with respectful people on his land. As for security, things aren’t getting any better, and when they get really bad, he said, two things will be important: keeping away people who are trying to steal what you’ve had the foresight to stockpile and fighting to protect your freedom and your family. “I don’t like violence,” he said, “but you have to protect your wife and kids.”
          “Don’t you think Christianity demands pacifism?” I asked.
             He said he knew Jesus said to turn the other cheek, but added that he also said to sell your cloak and buy a sword if you don’t have one. “I’m not going to be meek,” he said.
              “The meek will inherit the earth,” I said.
                 “I know, I know,” he said, and looked at the ground.
                   When I hazarded that prepping seemed misanthropic, Tory countered, “I love people. I wouldn’t have you here if I didn’t. I wouldn’t have a store. Without people there’d be no community, no survival. A lone survivor in the woods? Good luck with that!” His voice was warm.
              I have to admit that I used to struggle with understanding what Christ meant by "the meek" ... until I read Marcus Wynne's novel, The Sword of Michael. (You can read my review here). Wynne described a character that is meek and loving, yet also strong and willing and able to protect his friends and, for that matter, humanity as a whole. What the character illustrated was that "meekness" and "humility" for Christians was to submit to the will of God and recognize that God is the source of our gifts and abilities, rather than seeking glory for ourselves. This is very different from what the secular world wants us to believe constitutes "meekness" or "humility." The secular world wants us to believe that the meek person is essentially a dumb animal willing to put up with anything and everything, but that is far from the truth. Even if you don't like modern fantasy novels, I would suggest reading Wynne's book just because it is such a good example of what is real meekness. And then, for my LDS readers, consider the example of Captain Moroni.
                        Second, one man fired warning shots into the ground to scare off some looters ... and was arrested and jailed for discharging a firearm within city limits. The lessons here is that the government is not here to help, and don't use your firearm unless you can claim self-defense.
                          Third, one of the men interviewed had distributed firearms to his neighbors who were defenseless. A few points in this regard. (a) You had better have neighbors you can trust before you hand them a weapon; not only that they won't turn and use the weapon on you, but that you can trust them to be responsible in their handling and use of the weapon. (b) Be careful of running afoul of laws regarding the transfer of weapons. As illustrated by the guy firing the warning shots, the police are not necessarily give you a pass just because you are in the midst of a disaster. And, (c), be aware that if the person missuses the weapon, you could be held legally liable under various theories including, but not limited to, negligent entrustment. 
                    "How Seamless Steel Tubing is Made: "Walls Without Welds" ~ 1950 US Steel Pipe Manufacturing"--Jeff Quitney (3 min.). Nothing particularly special about this video. I just thought it was a fascinating process. 
                    • The so-called "MAGAbomber" has been captured, but don't expect this story to stay in the news for long: the suspect is a Native American named Cesar Altier Sayoc, so it doesn't really fit the narrative.
                    • Liberals really are crazy:
                    In his remarkable book The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion, Haidt recalls a telling experiment. He and his colleagues Brian Nosek and Jesse Graham sought to discover how well conservative and what Haidt terms ‘liberal’ (ie: progressive) students understood one another by having them answer moral questions as they thought their political opponents would answer them. “The results were clear and consistent,” remarks Haidt. “In all analyses, conservatives were more accurate than liberals.” Asked to think the way a liberal thinks, conservatives answered moral questions just as the liberal would answer them, but liberal students were unable to do the reverse. Rather, they seemed to put moral ideas into the mouths of conservatives that they don’t hold. To put it bluntly, Haidt and his colleagues found that progressives don’t understand conservatives the way conservatives understand progressives. This he calls the ‘conservative advantage,’ and it goes a long way in explaining the different ways each side deals with opinions unlike their own. People get angry at what they don’t understand, and an all-progressive education ensures that they don’t understand.

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