Friday, August 27, 2021

Hurricane Ida May Be Category 3 or 4 When It Strikes Gulf Coast

Hurricane Ida Storm Track

    The Associated Press is reporting that "Ida aims to hit New Orleans on Hurricane Katrina anniversary." Per the article:

    Hurricane Ida struck Cuba on Friday and threatened to slam into Louisiana with far greater force over the weekend, prompting New Orleans’ mayor to order everyone outside the protection of the city’s levees to evacuate.

    Intensifying rapidly Friday from a tropical storm to a hurricane with top winds of 80 mph (128 kph) as it crossed western Cuba, Ida was forecast to strengthen into a powerful Category 3 hurricane before making landfall along the U.S. Gulf Coast late Sunday, the National Hurricane Center said. [Ed.: others are predicting it will be a Category 4 storm when it hits the coast]

    A hurricane warning was issued for most of the Louisiana coast from Intracoastal City to the mouth of the Pearl River. A tropical storm warning was extended to the Mississippi-Alabama line.

    Residents along Louisiana’s coast braced for Ida to bring destructive wind and rain on the exact date Hurricane Katrina devastated a large swath of the Gulf Coast exactly 16 years earlier. ...

Also:

    New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell ordered the evacuation of everyone living outside the levee system that protects the area from flooding. She did not say how many people lived there, but urged residents with medical conditions and other special needs to get out early.

    Officials warned they plan to close floodgates Saturday afternoon on two highways near New Orleans, increasing the sense of urgency for those planning to flee.

    “Now is the time,” Cantrell said.

    Officials decided against evacuating New Orleans hospitals. There’s little room for their patients elsewhere, with hospitals from Texas to Florida already reeling from a spike in coronavirus patients, said Dr. Jennifer Avengo, the city’s health director..

    The White House said President Joe Biden and FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell would discuss hurricane preparations Friday in a conference call with the governors of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said FEMA plans to send nearly 150 medical personnel and almost 50 ambulances to the Gulf Coast to assist strained hospitals.

 This sounds like another mess in the making.

    Meanwhile, Reuters reports that "U.S. oil and gas companies on Friday raced to complete evacuations from offshore Gulf of Mexico platforms as Tropical Storm Ida advanced toward oilfields that provide 17% of the nation's oil production." The article continues: "Oil companies had shut 59% of their Gulf oil production and 49% of natural gas output as of Friday, according to the U.S. offshore regulator. A total of 90 offshore facilities were evacuated and 11 drilling vessels moved out of harm's way." Finally, the article also mentions that Over 45% of U.S. refining capacity lies along the Gulf Coast. In other words, Reuters is telling us to expect gas prices to spike above the high prices we currently suffer due to Biden's policies.

    NOAA has issued an advisory including the following:

    A Storm Surge Warning has been issued from east of Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana, to the Mississippi/Alabama border including Vermilion Bay, Lake Borgne, Lake Pontchartrain, and Lake Maurepas.

    A Hurricane Warning has been issued for the coast of Louisiana from Intracoastal City to the Mouth of the Pearl River, including Lake Pontchartrain, Lake Maurepas, and Metropolitan New Orleans.

    A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for the northern Gulf coast from the Mouth of the Pearl River to the Mississippi/Alabama border. A Tropical Storm Warning has also been issued for the coast of Louisiana from west of Intracoastal City to Cameron.

The storm surge, according to a Wall Street Journal article, is expected to be 11 feet.

2 comments:

  1. I live in the Southwest corner of Ohio and even here we re not totally immune to the effects of hurricanes. I will never forget the day the Hurricane Ike...or at least the "shell" of it traveled right up the Mississippi River and into the Ohio River Valley. For a few hours the wind blew at a sustained 70 mph. The trees around here are not adapted to hurricanes and tropical storms...they do not flex like Palmettos and such. Some areas were without power for two weeks. I had power whereas my neighbor 30 feet away was on a different circuit and they had to wait 10 days to get electric back. Quite often we get the leftover rain...usually in inches and have localized flooding.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It looks as though Ida may take the same path. Best of luck and blessings to you.

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