Monday, January 30, 2017

January 30, 2017 -- A Quick Run Around the Web



Firearms/Self-Defense/Prepping:
  • "Firearms Safety: Startle Fire"--Blue Sheepdog. The author discusses two recent incidents where an LEO discharged their firearm after being startled. Which gets us back to the issue of whether one should keep your finger off the trigger until you are taking the shot (which seems to be the majority position) or whether it is okay to be ready beforehand as Gabe Suarez argues. The article doesn't really get into this debate, considering that the additional reaction time is only a tenth of a second and that superior training will make up for a delayed response. Rather, the author examines the role of different team members to increase safety. Anyway, give it a look see.
  • "A Thought on 'Deterrents'"--McYoung's Musings. McYoung discusses the erroneous belief that having a deterrent (whatever it is) will magically keep you from being the victim of a crime; that is, that the deterrent is all you need or that it will necessarily keep someone from attacking you. He notes that for many people, the deterrent is, in reality a bluff (or bluster), and is, therefore, ineffective because the person lacks the willingness, knowledge, awareness, ability and commitment to actually deter or defend himself. Coupled with this is that the decision whether an attack will occur is up to the attacker, not you. And he will make his decision based on his "reading" of you and whether he is willing to go further than you.
       McYoung also goes on to discuss the danger of a lack of willingness, knowledge, awareness, ability and commitment to a potential victim because, to make up for the lack, many people will resort to belligerence. The danger here is that by being belligerent, the victim will probably make the issue personal for the attacker, leaving it difficult for the attacker to withdraw without saving face, and giving him an additional motive to not only make the attack, but make it more violent. 
       Read the whole thing.
  • "Is Slide-to-Frame Fit Important for Accuracy?"--Shooting Times. Yes. The author notes that even with a loose slide to frame fit, he can generally get useful accuracy as the barrel and slide will typically return to a center position after each shot. But, occasionally it won't. Then the loose fitting can lead to a flyer. 
  • "Skill Set: Avoid and Escape"--Tactical Wire. The author notes that "[a]nytime you fight there are great risks. Avoiding or escaping allows you to win the 'fight' without risk." He goes on to discuss the need to practice techniques to avoid or escape a fight or situation building to a fight. He doesn't mention the "count to 5" tactic, unfortunately.
  • "A Handy Chart"--Blue Collar Prepping. A link to a PDF or high resolution image of a one-page chart setting out the phonetic, morse, semaphore, and maritime flag codes for the alphabet.
  • "‘Lone Wolf’ Life Expectancy…?"--SHTF School. The author warns that there is only so much you can do, and only so many hours you can stay awake, on your own.
  • "Gunsmithing the AR: 3 Tips for Buffers & Recoil Springs"--Gun Digest. A guide to the different buffers and springs between the carbine and rifle variants of the AR.


Other Stuff:
57% of Likely U.S. Voters favor a temporary ban on refugees from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen until the federal government approves its ability to screen out potential terrorists from coming here. Thirty-three percent (33%) are opposed, while 10% are undecided.
Not surprisingly, Obama is still out of touch with most Americans: "Obama speaks out against Trump's refugee ban"--Boston Herald.
  • Shepherds say "to hell with the flock": "Christian groups oppose Trump's preference for Christian refugees"--Politico. The signers of a letter to Trump requesting resuming the flow of refugees regardless of whether they have been persecuted or not include the Accord Network, Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, Korean Churches for Community Development, the National Association of Evangelicals, the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, the Wesleyan Church, World Relief and World Vision. Interestingly, even The Atlantic notes that these "Christian" leaders are out of touch with their congregations, writing:
If so many prominent Christian leaders reject the notion that their fellow Christians should get preferential treatment, why has this become Trump’s policy? One possible answer is that these leaders don’t necessarily reflect what their flocks believe. Even if they think an open refugee policy is in line with the teachings of Christianity, lay Americans don’t necessarily feel the same way.
  • Trump to end slavery: "Trump targets tech's H-1B visa hiring tool"--USA Today. I've noted before the hypocrisy of technology companies laying off American engineers and programmers, while claiming that there is a shortage of American engineers and programmers in order to justify importing foreign STEM workers for lower wages and whose ability to remain in the U.S. is tied to their keeping their jobs with the sponsoring employer--essentially a form of indentured servitude. Trump appears willing to go to bat for Americans with STEM degrees and end the abuse of the H-1B program.

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